Friday, January 27, 2017

News From Randolph County

I got an e-mail today from folks who have connections with Randolph County Government that I thought folks here in Greensboro just might want to read:


"Billy,

Hope you are doing well.  The City water line to Randolph is getting more interesting. We learned on Monday that the line has grown from a 1.5 million gallon per day line to a 5.5 million gallon per day line. The proposed megasite project needs only 1 to 1.5 MGPD. If you hear anything about the plans for the "extra" 4 million gallons per day, let me know.

For context, according to City figures, Greensboro treated and pumped only 34 million gallons two days ago. So, if the 5.5 is true, the City intends to pump over 16% of what its citizens are using down to Randolph County. Could this be true? I thought we lived in a water poor area? Why did we pay for a Randleman Lake if we didn't really need it and were going to turn around and send a large part of that water back to the county it came from?"

My reply:

The Randalman Dam was never needed as evidenced by the work of Greensboro's award winning Water Conservation Director, Mike J Barron, who showed that area water usage dropped significantly between 1995 and 2010 and that actual water usage turned out to be half as much as was predicted. Mr Barron's work can be found at City of Greensboro water fraud: The Randleman Dam Scam



Now doesn't it seem strange to you that the City of Greensboro wants to pump almost 4 times as much water as the Megasite needs?

And doesn't it seem strange that water is going to be pumped over 60 miles to the megasite when it's only roughly 10 miles from the water treatment plant at the dam to the proposed Megasite near Liberty. There is a cost to pumping water you know, and it continues to go up year after year with every increase in the electric bill.

It makes no sense to Randolph County or to the Citizens of Southern Guilford County to be forced to buy Deep River water from the City of Greensboro when the cost would be less in the long run to buy from other communities closer by. Join your neighbors in Randolph County and fight this while you still can.
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